Special Education Process

Special Education Process

The Special Education Process includes:
Educational Areas of Need

Educational Areas of Need

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Disability Case Management

Disability Case Management

Services for families of children with disabilities
STOP THE CYCLE OF FAILURE IN EDUCATIONNATIONAL EDUCATION ADVOCACY PROJECTS REPORT:

  • A significant number of learning disabilities are either not identified or not properly assessed, and proper special education services are therefore not provided.
  • Despite intelligence levels adequate to go to college, students with unidentified or inappropriately identified learning disabilities drop out of school, barely pass and have lower paying unskilled jobs.
  • Children with learning disabilities are often segregated unnecessarily from non-disabled peers and thus denied the opportunity to develop necessary social skills.
  • Segregated classes are often not as academically rigorous and lack many resources found in regular education classes.
  • Non-disabled peers are denied the opportunity to learn about and from disabled peers, perpetuating stereotypes of the disabled.
  • Unaddressed leaning disabilities lead to behavioral problems that mask the initial disability (50-78% of juveniles incarcerated have learning disabilities).
  • Children with unaddressed learning disabilities often self medicate with alcohol and drugs (60% of people recovering from addictions have some form of a learning disability).
  • 75% of children in foster care want to go to college and only 3% get a bachelors degree.
  • High school dropouts will earn about $260,000 less than high school graduates and $800,000 less than college graduates in their lifetime.
  • High school dropouts have a life expectancy 9.2 years shorter than high school graduates.
  • A one-year increase in average years of schooling for dropouts would reduce murder and assault rates by almost 30%, motor vehicle theft by 20%, arson by 13%, and burglary and larceny by about 6%.
  • College graduates are 3 times more likely to vote than high school dropouts.
  • 3/4 of public schools report less than adequate conditions, roofs and electrical power needing repairs, renovations or modernization. The average repair needed per school is $2.2 million, or $3,800 per student.
  • 4 out of 10 secondary school teachers do not have a degree in the subject they teach.
  • English-Language Learners numbers increased in public schools from 3.5 million to 5.3 million, a 51% from 1980 to 2009. Only 12% of 4th grade ELLs scored proficient or above in math and only 5% of 8th grade ELLs. In reading only 3 percent of 4th and 8th grade ELLs were proficient or above.
  • We have a dropout crisis with 250,000 students failing to graduate each year.

White     4.8%
Black     9.9%
Latino     18.3%
Asian     4.4%
American Indian/Alaska Native  14.6%

  • ONLY 58 percent of first-time, full-time students, from public education, seeking a bachelor’s degree at a 4-year institution completed a bachelor’s degree at that institution within 6 years or 150 percent of normal completion time for the degrees, with graduation rates of 65% at private nonprofit institutions, 56% at public institutions and only 28% at private for-profit institutions. 6 year graduation completion rates varied by race/ ethnicity with Asian/Pacific Islander students at 69%, White students at 62%, Hispanic students at 50%, and Black and American Indian/Alaska Native students at 39% each. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. (2012). The Condition of Education 2011 (NCES 2012-045), Indicator 45.
  • 33% of public school students receive free or reduced price lunches.
  • 13% of public school students received Chapter 1 services. (federal program for poorly performing students in economically disadvantaged areas)On average, four out of 10 secondary school teachers do not have a degree in the subject they teach.
  • 1/2 of elementary school teachers have 25 or more students in a class.
  • 250,000 crimes a year on school property were reported to police.
  • Ten percent of 10th graders admit to taking a weapon to school during the past month.